Jorge Ramos and Liberalism’s Selective Vision

In the movie “Shallow Hal,” Jack Black plays Hal, an extremely (you guessed it) shallow man who only dates physically beautiful women.

The gist of it is this:

“[Hal] runs into self-help guru Tony Robbins, who hypnotizes him into recognizing only the inner beauty of women. Hal thereafter meets Rosemary, a largely obese woman whom only he can see as a vision of loveliness.”

In other words, what he physically sees is drop-dead gorgeous, despite the fact that she’s everything he always swore never to date.

He saw what his mind wanted him to see. It didn’t matter what reality was.

Hang on to that for a moment.

Recently, Univision anchor and acclaimed left-wing cheerleader Jorge Ramos has decided that “the solution to the migrant crisis at U.S.-Mexico border is to just legalize illegal immigrants.”

Tweet

The man literally believes that solving the problem of millions of people endlessly pouring over our borders unchecked, is to give them all a stamp of approval, a pat on the back, and keep the doors wide open for the next batch.

This isn’t news, obviously. Ramos is infamous for pushing amnesty and a general disregard for the rule of law when it comes to the border.

“At some point we will have to accept the fact that the border between Mexico and the United States is nothing more than an invention,” he wrote in January.  “Calling someone illegal is insulting to all of us, signaling support for the xenophobic, anti-immigrant attitudes exhibited by some Americans today,” said Ramos on another occasion.

No, this certainly isn’t new territory for Ramos.

But, as I read that latest tweet, I kept thinking about it in the context of something else I haven’t been able to get out of my head; something that Ramos did some weeks back.

In February, Ramos somehow secured an interview with Venezuelan socialist dictator Nicolas Maduro. Citing that he (Maduro) “didn’t like the things we were asking him about the lack of democracy in Venezuela, the torture and the political prisoners,” Ramos went on to detail the harrowing experience he and his crew had when they were abruptly stopped from filming, detained for hours, and had all interview material (memory cards, cameras, phones, etc.) confiscated.

Ramos’ crime?

He showed the socialist Venezuelan dictator photos of children eating out of dumpsters. Maduro immediately got up, and that’s when Ramos and his crew got a little meet & greet with Maduro’s security detail.

It made for a harrowing news story for Ramos—but it left me a little confused.

Ramos routinely advocates for leftist policy and leftist candidates, and yet he traipses down to South America, shoves an unsavory photo of starving children in a leftist dictator’s face as a sort of “how dare you”—and then turns right back around and supports the same big-government, leftist policies back here in the US. Indeed, even after seeing first-hand the effects of socialism on Venezuela’s poor people, and experiencing the heavy hand of true dictatorship himself, Ramos doesn’t back down from his leftism. And he’s perfectly fine with letting that continue to pour right in.

I get it—this is classic “we’ll do it the right way” syndrome, but in its most basic form, this is seeing what one wants to see. Ramos sees leftism through the prism of academia; through the prism of “what if.”

What if we could achieve utopia? What if we could all live in harmony, without borders and without fences? What if?

Think back to my initial illustration for a moment. In the film, Hal doesn’t see reality. He sees the version that his mind convinces him really exists.

Jorge Ramos and his ilk don’t seem to be any different. And that’s exactly why within just a few months of each other you can have someone decry the effects of Venezuelan socialism (and be detained for doing it), and in nearly the same breath welcome the unlawful flow of people unchecked into this country—which spits in the face of the very rule of law that protects us from outcomes like Venezuela.

Here’s the thing:

There isn’t a single example of an open-borders, amnesty for anyone and everyone policy that has led to good—but yet liberals like Ramos continue to “see” it.

There isn’t a single example of socialism ever existing without compromising liberty to some degree—but yet liberals like Ramos continue to “see” it.

It’s easy to have an academically hypnotized vision of the world, when you’re protected from it. You see, Ramos lives in a perfectly curated, extremely safe little world consisting of an “exclusive island home in Miami where he is surrounded by multiple bodies of water, wrought-iron fences and a 20-foot wall of concrete and shrubbery that guard his $6 million mansion.” Sure, run around the world decrying the horrors of dictatorships, come home and live in the shroud of luxury that free market capitalism and a constitutional republic afford you.

He sees what he wants to see.

Meanwhile President Trump—who Ramos openly calls a “bully” in a piece written (ironically) around the same time as his encounter with Maduro—is one of only a few politicians standing up for the safety of the American people and for the sovereignty of our rule of law. It’s not about race, Jorge. It’s not about making America “white” again. Get a grip, grow up, and get a better narrative. Try a little harder; be a little more creative. The race card’s getting tired.

It’s about saving this country from lawlessness; from failed ideologies; from danger; from the very poverty, corruption and horrors you yourself experienced first-hand, Jorge.

That’s what it’s about.

Start seeing it.

Mary Ramirez is a full-time writer, creator of www.afuturefree.com, and contributor to The Chris Salcedo Show on KSEV 700 Radio in Houston. She can be reached at: afuturefree@aol.com; or on Twitter: @AFutureFree

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