Pop Culture and The Popularization of The Racism Narrative

They say it’ll give you chills.

Usher’s recent unorthodox performance of his new song “Chains”—during which he appeared on stage in handcuffs—was meant to shock.

It was supposed to shed light on police brutality, largely against the African American community.

His music video (complete with interactive facial recognition that stops the video when you look away) shows a parade of people who died as a result of police, while the words “we still in chains” plays over and over.

The video challenges you to look in the eyes of each victim, and read their stories (though brief and largely void of detail). It constructs a grim picture—and warns the listeners that “revolution is coming.”

It hurts to lose a loved one, especially a child. I have a child, and cannot even tolerate the mere thought of losing her.

I can’t even begin to imagine the torturous pain. And I’m certainly not going to pretend that I can.

Each and every life is precious, and each loss of life is tragic.

But let me be blunt:

For the rest of my article (and to find out what I was being so blunt about…!), please click HERE to be redirected to TheBlaze.com!

One thought on “Pop Culture and The Popularization of The Racism Narrative

  1. I agree we need to consider the data when we make blanket claims, such as those of institutional racism in police departments. On the other hand, have you pondered data like this? http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/04/upshot/the-measuring-sticks-of-racial-bias-.html?_r=0
    Certainly blacks are incarcerated at a hugely disproportionate rate, and there is a problem in our country. And, even if that is a result of creating a disproportionate amount of crime (for the sake of argument) there is a problem. We have to investigate the problem holistically.

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